Online + Frankfurt am Main | 15 – 23 October 2022

Premieres, award winners and a diverse film program

  • The winner of the Special 75th Anniversary Prize at Cannes Film Festival TORI AND LOKITA will be shown at B3

  • Keynote by Hollywood producer Niels Juul

  • More than 100 moving image contributions from 30 countries with international premieres in the presence of the filmmakers

Frankfurt - October 10, 2022 - The winner of the Special 75th Anniversary Prize at Cannes Film Festival TORI AND LOKITA will be shown at the B3 Biennial of the Moving Image.
Little Tori and the adolescent Lokita have come alone from Africa to Europe. In Belgium today, they fight the difficult conditions of their exile with their invincible friendship. The film is by Belgian filmmakers Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne, who will be honored this year with the B3 BEN Lifetime Achievement Award. Luc Dardenne will receive the B3 BEN Award in person on October 14 and will also hold a Master Class together with renowned film critic Jörg Taszman on October 15.
 
B3 also welcomes Niels Juul, one of Hollywood's most successful producers. On Monday, October 17, he will give an insight into the film business in a Master Class and talk about alternative financing options. Niels Juul has worked with the best directors in the industry and has extensive experience in financing and producing feature films. In 2008, Juul was appointed CEO of the Italian-American film company Cecchi Gori Pictures. There he was instrumental in financing their first major film production: SILENCE by Martin Scorsese. Since then, he has worked on numerous prestigious films, including THE IRISHMAN, KILLERS OF THE FLOWER MOON and FERRARI.
 
Visitors can look forward to more than 100 moving image contributions from 30 countries, as well as a film competition program with German premieres in the presence of the filmmakers.
This year's film program focuses on the genre of horror: In the musical thriller GIVE ME PITY! director Amanda Kramer combines a horror story with the nostalgia of the eighties. South African horror thriller GOOD MADAM draws its eeriness from both a supernatural threat and apartheid-era relics.
But there are hopeful films as well: The documentary LONG LIVE MY HAPPY HEAD demonstrates how art, humor and love can combat our fears of mortality.